Retrograde Waters

Hello. I'm Rose, 20-something Nebraskan. If you want to know more feel free to ask, I'm not going to waste space here.
This is a personal blog that serves as a miscellaneous collection of things I find cute, cool, interesting, and enraging.
I know that all people are equal and deserve the same rights and respect, and I welcome everyone of all and any race, religion, nationality, gender, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, romantic orientation, age, ability, anything else I may have forgotten (let me know!) and any combination or absence thereof. I do NOT welcome discrimination and bigotry. If *I* say or do anything that is offensive or insensitive, please tell me! I try to consider everyone/different perspectives and experiences when speaking, but I could always make a mistake, and educating myself is a constant process: I will be grateful rather than offended to have small-mindedness on my part pointed out. It's the only way I'll know to correct it.
Thank you and have a nice day!
(Blog NSFW: strong language, various topics of discussion, and occasional images of anatomy and/or nudity.)
Recent Tweets @
Posts I Like
Who I Follow
Posts tagged "random historical tidbits"
The other thing about London is it’s ambiguously the capital of England because it predates England by hundreds of years and it wasn’t even intended to be the capital by the Romans. They built this lovely capital in Colchester, which got burnt down. London became the capital by default. During the whole medieval period, it wasn’t really the capital, it was sort of like this difficult city.
Ben Aaronovitch explains further about London during a discussion with fellow authors China Mieville, Kate Griffin and Suzanne McLeod. (Published in SFX magazine, issue #225, September 2012.)

(via ohdeargodwhy)

soyonscruels:

plenilune:

In 1585, the townspeople of Annecy, Savoy, France, became alarmed over an apple that gave out a “great and confused noise.” Believing it to be full of demons, they pushed the apple into a river.

i do not have anything to add to this tbh

#‘a great and confused noise’ #THIS APPLE IS FULL OF DEMONS #how many demons fit in an apple???#‘they’? ‘pushed’? HOW MANY PEOPLE DID IT TAKE TO GET THIS APPLE INTO THE RIVER

(via nextmorgothidol)

puntland:

Coastal Sanaag & Bari, Puntland - Mid to late 1840s

Illustrations done by French explorer Charles Guillain, between 1846 and 1848, during his visits to the coastal Sanaag and Bari regions of Puntland.

(via diasporicroots)

praedictum-impaver:

 Laverie Vallee (July 18, 1875 – February 6, 1949), best known by her stage name Charmion, was a Sacramento born trapeze artist who possessed strength and a physique most men would be envious of. However, she was most well known for her risqué striptease performances.

The act opened with Charmion taking the stage in full Victorian attire. She would then mount the trapeze and proceed to undress to her leotard while performing impressive and strength-dependant stunts. The act was incredibly impressive and provocative for the era. However, the controversy created by her performances did not prevent the formulation of a devoted, and mostly male, fan base.

One of her greatest fans was Thomas Edison. As a result of that adoration, on November 11, 1901 Charmion committed a simplified version of her act to film for Edison. The film, simply entitled ‘Trapeze Disrobing Act’ focused more on the erotic aspect of the performance, though a few remarkable feats of strength are featured.

Source

(via mydirtytinyroom)

marthur:

ponpongaygay:

gazingthroughthefog:

I forget that old cameras don’t always have to take formal pictures

this makes me ridiculously happy 

worth mentioning that these photos are PHOTOS OF MOST OF THE CONTEMPORARY EUROPEAN MONARCHY

(via ohdeargodwhy)

fripperiesandfobs:

Wedding dress, 1882-83

From the Cincinnati Art Museum via Worn Through

(via mamabirdmargaritas)

odditiesoflife:

The Enchantress of Numbers  -  The World’s First Computer Programmer

Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron and now commonly known as Ada Lovelace, was an English mathematician and writer chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognized as the first algorithm intended to be processed by a machine. Because of this, she is often considered the world’s first computer programmer.

The Analytical Engine was the first fully-automatic calculating machine. British computing pioneer Charles Babbage (1791-1871) first conceived the idea of an advanced calculating machine to calculate and print mathematical tables in 1812. This machine, conceived by Babbage in 1834, was designed to evaluate any mathematical formula. Only part of the machine was completed before his death in 1871.

(via ohdeargodwhy)

midwest-monster:

pussybow:

thereisnoalgebra:

midwest-monster:

broadway antique market

i bought this telegram, because it’s probably the best thing i’ve ever seen.  i’m framing it.  it cost $1.

oh my god

this is fucking amazing

Still one of my best antique finds.

(via teacupsandcyanide)

In 1808, Napoleon, running out of scenic holiday destinations to invade, somehow totally forgot about his neighbor to the south, Spain. So that year he dispatched his troops, kicking off the Peninsular War.

Only 20 years old and working as a barmaid in the town of Valdepenas, Juana Galan was not expecting a surge of French soldiers to come storming through her village. But on June 6, that’s exactly what happened. At that time, most of the men were fighting Napoleon’s forces elsewhere in the nation. Juana, unfazed by things like rifles and Frenchmen and French riflemen, began organizing the women in her village to form a trap for the approaching army.

When the army arrived, Juana and her friends were ready. They dumped boiling water and oil on the French troops, which by all accounts will instantly take the fight out of pretty much anyone. Then Juana, armed with only a batan, beat back the heavily armed French cavalry with her squad of village women, almost none of whom were armed with guns.

The French retreated, giving up on capturing not just Juana’s town but the entire province of La Mancha, leading to ultimate Spanish victory. Today, she is seen in Spain as a national hero, a symbol of resistance, strength, patriotism, feminism and hitting shit with a stick.

(x)

That’s one hell of a portrait.

hitting shit with a stick

This is maybe the best portrait of anyone that I’ve ever seen, ever.

(via occupiedmuslim)

1bohemian:

Two men dancing, Harlem, 1920s.

According to George Chauncey’s eponymous Gay New York, the Harlem Renaissance of the ’20s provided an opportunity for gay men to create their own social and cultural spaces within the burgeoning nightlife in the neighborhood. 

1bohemian:

Two men dancing, Harlem, 1920s.

According to George Chauncey’s eponymous Gay New York, the Harlem Renaissance of the ’20s provided an opportunity for gay men to create their own social and cultural spaces within the burgeoning nightlife in the neighborhood. 

(via marvelous-merbutler)